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From Zero to $15 Million

Recently I read an article on Under30CEO.com entitled “Top 15 Young Female Entrepreneurs and Their Rising Companies” and was so inspired by these women.  Each one of these young entrepreneurs is between the age of 15 and 29 running multi-million dollar businesses.  They’ve all demonstrated oodles of creativity in their approach to either new or existing markets.  I immediately knew that I wanted to speak to some of these women and find out what their experience has been like so far.

The first woman that I will be interviewing in a webinar on January 17th is Juliette Brindak.  She is the co-founder of MissOandFriends.com which is a website that aims to help tween girls build self-esteem.

It all started with Juliette at the age of 10 drawing pictures of cool girls—sort of like paper dolls, only cuter.  Her mother, little sister and friends joined in on the fun and after 5 years of playing, Miss O & Friends was formed.  It’s the only lifestyle brand created by girls for girls between the ages of 8 and 14.  Since the launch in 2005 when Juliette was just 16, Proctor and Gamble has become its largest investor and Miss O is the #3 “Girls Only” website in the world.  The company was valued at $15 million in 2006.

The company’s goal is to help girls build a strong sense of self and self-esteem so that they will be less likely to fall prey to the pressures of fitting in and being popular.  It’s a really fun website that also has a Girl 2 Girl wall where the girls can offer advice to one another creating a sense of community and offering support with issues that bother young girls.Through the Miss O site, tweens can play, create, learn, exchange ideas, get help, compare experiences, get published and much more … all within a safe, non-chat environment.

In addition to the Miss O & Friends responsibilities, Juliette, now 22, has a syndicated column called Miss O’s “KidsCounsel” (young girl Dear Abby).  As the spokesperson for Miss O, she is regularly interviewed in the press, radio and TV.  When she was 16,the company released the Miss O books, which have sold120,000 copies.

 

Recently, she has added another aspect to the site called Miss O Moms.  It offers parenting tips, advice from doctors and psychologists, recipes and a way to connect with other moms around the world.  It’s a way of bringing mothers and daughters closer together while building more understanding in a fun and easy spirit.

Her company continues to grow.  With more great ideas of how to address the tween and moms markets, the company is expanding and in the process hiring more talent.  Further Juliette is looking for potential investors.

There so much more to say about Juliette and her accomplishments, but even more so, I would like to know what it was like for this young girl, barely out of tweenhood starting a business.  How did she bridge the gap between drawing some cool cartoons and a full-fledged business? What was it like getting the support of her family and friends? How did she handle speaking to vendors, bankers and investors?  Did she experience any particular problems or prejudice because she was young and female?  What were some of her biggest challenges and how did she overcome them?  If she were to do it all over again, what would she do differently?  What has been the most rewarding aspect of starting the business?  If she has one piece of advice for women thinking about starting a business, what would it be?

If you would like to know the answers to these questions and be able to ask Juliette your burning question, then sign up now for this information packed webinar.

Susan Bagyura guides women through their fears, doubts and don’t-know-how-to’s of starting a business to successfully and confidently owning their first business. http://powderpuffguide.com

In this Teleseminar, I will be interviewing Juliette Brindak and Kyle Smitley. If you would like to know their answers to interview questions, then register for this teleseminar: http://powderpuffguide.com/teleseminar/. and also be able to ask your questions to them.